Archive for February, 2018

7 Cost-Effective Ways to Reduce Heating Bills

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

(Family Features)–Many homeowners think big when trying to find effective solutions to skyrocketing heating bills, like replacing the furnace or installing new windows, but there are plenty of smaller projects that can make a difference when it comes to your energy savings this winter.

Consider these tips to keep your home cozy without your energy bill putting a damper on the season:

Take advantage of solar heat.
Installing solar panels is one sure way to capture the sun's energy, but there are other ways to harness that heat. Unobscured windows and skylights can let the rays in, and with them comes some heat. Leave curtains open during the day and trim foliage outdoors to provide a clear path for sunlight. Just be sure windows are well-sealed so you're not offsetting any heat gain with a cool draft.

Install or upgrade your heat pump.
Heat pumps work differently than traditional cooling and heating systems. They recycle heat found in the air and ground, moving thermal energy between indoors and outdoors instead of generating it from scratch by burning fossil fuels. When properly installed, an air-source heat pump can deliver one-and-one-half to three times more heat energy to a home than the electrical energy it consumes, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

They can save electricity costs by 30-40 percent.
In particularly cold climates, technology is making it possible to reap energy-saving benefits. An option such as the Hyper-Heating Inverter(r) from Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating offers a significant advancement in heat pumps. This technology uses an intelligent compressor system to deliver heat even when outdoor temperatures are as low as -13 F, and a quick-start feature provides warm air instantly.

Move furniture away from vents.
Free air flow is an important component of efficient heating and obstructed vents interrupt that process. Not only can furniture be damaged from the continual air flow of a vent, it can block the circulation patterns that were intended when your home's ductwork was installed. For optimum efficiency, avoid placing furniture on top of vents, and if it's impossible to avoid, close those vents so the airflow is directed elsewhere.

Reverse your ceiling fans.
Your ceiling fans can play an important role in air circulation. Leaving them off will obviously make rooms warmer, but some circulation can be a good thing. Most fans offer a switch that lets you reverse the fan direction, which pushes air upward instead of down. This makes for less of a cooling effect while still moving air for better temperature distribution.

Install a programmable thermostat.
A degree or two may not feel like much of a difference, but it's a change you'll definitely see on your energy bill. Just a small adjustment in your standard thermostat setting can result in reductions of 5 or even 10 percent of your overall bill. Another potential big-impact strategy: adjust temperatures when you're away from home. A programmable thermostat will let you turn temps down when no one is there to benefit from the warmth, then bring them back up shortly before you're scheduled to return home. When you're away unexpectedly or need to adjust your typical schedule, an option like the kumo cloud(r) mobile app offered by Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating allows control of your home's cooling and heating system from your smartphone or other connected device.

Adjust your hot water heater.
Not only can keeping the air comfortable add up, so can heating water for basic household functions. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that water heating is the second largest energy expense in most homes. However, you may have your heater set higher than necessary. For every 10-degree drop, you can expect to reduce energy costs by 3-5 percent.

Insulate the attic.
A poorly sealed or insulated attic can be among a home's biggest energy drains. Warm air naturally rises, but rather than recirculating throughout the home, it may be wasted if it's just escaping out of the attic. Sealing cracks and adding insulation can help reduce this loss. Don't overlook the access door, which can allow warm air to escape if it fits poorly or isn't well-sealed.

Source: Mitsubishi

Century 21 AA Realty Long Island

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

How-To Take Control of Your Money in 2018

Thursday, February 1st, 2018

(Family Features)–Counting calories isn't the only way you can resolve to bring about positive change in your life during the new year. If you're like many Americans, it may be a good time to start counting your way toward better financial health.

The past year brought financial setbacks to nearly two-thirds of United States households, according to a survey by the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE). In fact, more than a quarter of U.S. adults say the current quality of their financial lives are worse than they hoped. Topping the list of setbacks in 2017 were transportation issues (23 percent), housing repairs or maintenance (20 percent), and the inability to keep up with debt and falling behind on bill payments (16 percent).

In an effort to reverse that trend, more than two-thirds of U.S. adults will make financial New Year's resolutions for 2018, according to the survey. Among those that plan to step up their financial game, top goals include setting and following a budget (40 percent), making a plan to get out of debt (39 percent), establishing savings (32 percent) and boosting retirement savings (31 percent). 

"We continue to see a lot of anxiety about money," says Ted Beck, president and CEO of NEFE. "Three-quarters of Americans said something causes them financial stress, and it's most often not saving enough and debt that are to blame."

Reduce money stress and take control of your finances with these tips for financial success from the experts at NEFE:
 
1. Get debt under control. Take a hard look at what you owe. If there's a clear warning sign of too much debt, take action. Set a goal to reduce your debt load next year by 5-10 percent. That might mean reducing impulse shopping. When you face temptation, delay the purchase and give yourself time to consider whether it's a wise move that fits within your budget.

2. Save now and do so often. Preparing for unexpected events like medical emergencies can help reduce the financial impact of a life-changing event. Emergency savings can offset unexpected costs and help you get back on solid footing. A good rule of thumb is to have 6-9 months of income set aside. If that feels out of reach, start with a smaller goal, even as little as $500. When it comes to saving, it's also a smart idea to think long term. Review your long-term savings and ensure they are on target for your retirement plans. 

3. Shop for better services. You may be surprised by how much you can save when you periodically shop for the most competitive rates on your recurring bills. Make a game out of shopping providers to find the best value on your insurance policies, cell phone plan, internet and utilities. Ask your providers about current rates and any promotions available to long-time, loyal customers. Then look at alternative providers to determine where you can trim some spending. Be sure to understand your current offering thoroughly so that you are comparing apples to apples. 

4. Understand what's behind your financial decisions. If you ever wonder why you feel good about spending money on vacations but avoid saving for retirement, the answer may lie in your unique values and how they influence your financial decision-making. Consider taking the LifeValues Quiz at smartaboutmoney.org, where you can also find help with setting goals and getting your finances in order.
 
Source: Family Features, National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

Century 21 AA Realty Long Island

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.


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